Barrier Canyon.

May 31, 2012 § Leave a comment

“Humans have been leaving images about ever since discovering that it was possible to add graphics to bone, metals, ceramics, and rocks. Some of this art is quite old; hundreds, thousands, or even tens of thousands of years.”

http://www.ancestral.com/meaning.html

http://www.ancestral.com/home.html

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Petroglyphs near Moab

http://www.wheeleraudio.com/BritishColumbia2008.htm

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The sandstone cliffs of Sego Canyon are an outdoor art gallery and a holy place. Native Americans painted and chipped their religious visions, clan symbols, and records of events onto the cliffs. There are three distinct styles present which represent three separate cultures and time periods. These cultures are known to have been in the area during the past several thousand years.

This impressive site is on the National Register of Historic Places. It undergoing long term conservation and preservation treatment. The Antiquitites Act of 1906 and the Archaeological Resources Protection Act provides for serious penalties to vandals.

http://www.scienceviews.com/indian/segocanyon.html

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Barrier Canyon Great Gallery

http://www.jqjacobs.net/rock_art/barrier1.html

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“Of Utah’s many impressive prehistoric rock art sites, none is more striking than the Great Gallery in Horseshoe Canyon, Canyonlands National Park, Wayne County, Utah. The Great Gallery is the type-site for the Barrier Canyon style and the largest of the Barrier Canyon style rock art gallery sites. More than 300 feet in width, the Great Gallery contains more than 60 figures, many of which are anthropomorphs of life.

Typically, the billboard-sized galleries are not found near habitation sites but are often in very visible locations near the mouths or junctions of long canyons. These paneled canyons would have afforded the nomadic people, in their annual seasonal rounds, passage through difficult terrain to and from higher ground. Walking in these canyons, it is not difficult to imagine the significance these ancient rock art galleries would have held for the individual viewers representing hundreds of generations of a dynamic people—who lived on the Colorado Plateau for at least six thousand years.

At all the large Barrier Canyon style rock art sites, life-size human-like figures are prominent. It also appears that many of the anthropomorphic images were painted by different individuals—across an extended time-span, most likely millennia. Yet, considering the indicated time-depth, there are surprisingly few occurrences of image-superimposition within the style and this holds true for all Barrier Canyon rock art sites, large and small.” – Dave Susec

http://www.bcsproject.org/barrierstyle.html

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Sego Canyon

http://www.wheeleraudio.com/BritishColumbia2008.htm

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“Utah’s collection of rock art styles rank among the best in the United States—in numbers, in time-depth, and in aesthetic quality. From the thirteen to fifteen apparent styles of Utah rock art, the Barrier Canyon style is generally recognized as the state’s premier prehistoric form. Surprisingly, Barrier Canyon style rock art sites are still being discovered on the Colorado Plateau. When the BCS PROJECT began to document the Barrier Canyon style in 1992, the number of known sites was about 160. By 1998, the number was thought to be about 230. Today, the number of sites is estimated, by some, to be more than 250.

The Barrier Canyon style is unique in Southwest prehistory because its culture was hypothesized entirely from the existence of its rock art—paintings on the canyon walls of the northern Colorado Plateau (southeastern Utah, western Colorado, and northern Arizona). Only recognized, by Southwest archaeologist Polly Schaafsma, as a distinct rock art style some thirty years ago; the Barrier Canyon style has since emerged to be one of the two major Archaic-period painted rock art styles in the United States (perhaps in the entire New World). Even when considered on a global scale, the Barrier Canyon style is a remarkable body of visual images.” – Dave Susec

http://www.bcsproject.org/barrierstyle.html

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Barrier Canyon Rock Art

http://www.wheeleraudio.com/BritishColumbia2008.htm

The Fremont Culture thrived from about A.D. 600 to A.D.1250, and was contemporary with the Anasazi Culture of the Four Corners area. It is distinguished by its remarkable rock art. Like the Anasazi, the Fremont planted corn and lived in pithouses and surface stone structures. They constructed a distinctive basketry and made pottery. They had a complex social structure, as is illustrated in their rock art, and were highly adaptive to the extremes of their environment. At the top of the panel are the oldest figures. These are the line of large, red-painted figures with the rectangular-bodies and small-heads, which are similar to the Anasazi Basket maker style. Superimposed on the older, painted figures is a line of carved (pecked) human figures. Typically, these have trapezoids for the head and body. The most recent Freemont period is also represented by superimposed carvings. They are deeply groved outlines of two life-sized human figures with collars and waistbands, and the associated mountain sheep and abstract elements. This last group is representative of the Classic Fremont Style.

http://www.scienceviews.com/indian/segocanyon.html

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Utah Barrier Canyon Style Temple Mt Wash

http://www.irablock.com/Editorial/FremontIndianCulture/18061235_rbgNC3/1385069512_Rz77ptR

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Petroglyphs: Rock Art or Rock Writing?

Native American tradition combined with scientific decoding methods indicate that “rock art” is really a sophisticated form of writing.

The life-long research into Native American petroglyphs by LaVan Martineau, an orphan adopted into the Paiute tribe of southeastern Nevada and southwestern Utah, has resulted in detailed interpretations of the rock writings. His work, culminating in an interpretation of the famous Hopi Prophecy Rock, demonstrates a much greater information content in these picture-based drawings than was previously recognized. Martineau’s research implies the existence of early ideograph-based writing systems that could convey detailed meanings without including phonetic sound-based components.

http://www.johnpratt.com/items/docs/lds/meridian/2006/petroglyphs.html

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Pecked Barrier Canyon Style panels

Pecked Barrier Canyon Style panels are not common, but they are often exceptional. Here, larger anthropomorphic forms are surrounded by subservient figures. Notable are the arc of dots connecting the dog on the left to the central figures; and on the right, dots reaching out to the wandering anthropomorph.

http://www.singingdesert.com/Barrier-Canyon-Petroglyphs.html

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V i n t a g e – 1950’s – J U N E

May 31, 2012 § 2 Comments

 

Vintage clear Lucite purse, 1950s handbag, cut glass design, possibly Charles S. Kahn of Miami, Florida, mid century box purse

http://www.etsy.com/listing/99089841/vintage-clear-lucite-purse-1950s-handbag?ref=tre-2720323001-1

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1950s Cornflower Blue Lace Wiggle Dress & Jacket / Spring Cocktail Dress

http://www.etsy.com/listing/97835029/1950s-cornflower-blue-lace-wiggle-dress?ref=tre-2720323001-4

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V i n t a g e – 1950’s – J U N E   Etsy Treasury:

http://www.etsy.com/treasury/MTE0NjYzNjZ8MjcyMDMyMzAwMQ/v-i-n-t-a-g-e-1950s-j-u-n-e

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S O O T H I N G – A Q U A

May 30, 2012 § Leave a comment

 

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Antique Aqua Glass Torpedo Bottle – circa 1880-1890

http://www.etsy.com/listing/76879573/antique-aqua-glass-torpedo-bottle-circa?ref=tre-2722887102-1

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Vintage Wiggle Dress 1950s // Aqua Belted Shift Dress // Size M

http://www.etsy.com/listing/95103414/vintage-wiggle-dress-1950s-aqua-belted?ref=tre-2722887102-7

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S O O T H I N G – A Q U A   Etsy Treasury:

http://www.etsy.com/treasury/NzA0NjQyMHwyNzIyODg3MTAy/s-o-o-t-h-i-n-g-a-q-u-a

Walk.

May 30, 2012 § Leave a comment

 

“In the American Southwest, I began a lifelong love affair with a pile of rock.” – Edward Abbey

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“The longest journey begins with a single step, not with a turn of the ignition key.  That’s the best thing about a walking, the journey itself.  It doesn’t much matter whether you get where your going or not.  You’ll get there anyway.  Every good hike brings you eventually back home.  Right were you started.”
-Edward abbey

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Arizona Hike

http://www.dwfestival.com/places/arizona-trails/

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“…by bringing myself over the edge and back, I discovered a passion to live my days fully, a conviction that will sustain me like sweet water on the periodically barren plain of our short lives.”  – Jonathon Waterman

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Desert Arch Underside

http://watchingtheworldwakeup.blogspot.com/2010/12/thanksgiving-desert-hiking-part-2-fins.html

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“There may be more to learn from climbing the same mountain a hundred times than by climbing a hundred different mountains.”- Richard Nelson

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Desert Safety

http://www.forsythlv.com/desertsurvival.htm

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“You never climb the same mountain twice, not even in memory. Memory rebuilds the mountain, changes the weather, retells the jokes, remakes all the moves.”    – Lito Tejada-Fores

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Cool hiking photo

http://www.forsythlv.com/desertsurvival.htm

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“….If we look for private experience rather than public history, even getting to the top becomes an optional narrative rather than the main point, and those who only wander in high places become part of the story.” – Rebecca Solnit

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Red Rock Very Blue Sky

http://www.forsythlv.com/desertsurvival.htm

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“The aim of the mountaineer, if he wishes to be an artist in the full sense of word, is neither escape nor “the search for the absolute” as some have claimed, but rather seek that place where “the mystic remains silent and the poets start to speak towards men.”  – Bernard Amy

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Navajo Mountain Driftwood

http://www.horseshoemountainpottery.com/joe/blog/?tag=utah-desert-hiking

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“In a sense everything that is exists to climb. All evolution is a climbing towards a higher form. Climbing for life as it reaches towards the consciousness, towards the spirit. We have always honored the high places because we sense them to be the homes of gods. In the mountains there is the promise of… something unexplainable. A higher place of awareness, a spirit that soars. So we climb… and in climbing there is more than a metaphor; there is a means of discovery.” – Rob Parker

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Breathtaking Red Rock Cliff and Trees

http://adventure.nationalgeographic.com/adventure/trips/southwest-united-states/arizona/

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“Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far they can go.” – T.S. Eliot

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“You need special shoes for hiking – and a bit of a special soul as well.”  – Emme Woodhull-Bache

Desert rain.

May 29, 2012 § 4 Comments

 

 

“Sunshine is delicious, rain is refreshing, wind braces us up, snow is exhilarating; there is really no such thing as bad weather, only different kinds of good weather. ” – John Ruskin

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Sedona Monsoon

http://www.artinnaturephotography.com/photo/sedona-monsoon/

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“If it ain’t the heat, it’s the humility.” – Yogi Berra

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Thunderstorm clouds in northern Arizona

http://richardbarron.net/traveller/2008/07/

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Arizona storm clouds

“The photo above showing mature cumulonimbus clouds looming over the Bradshaw Mountains of central Arizona was taken on August 3, 2010. These towering storm clouds began to form during the morning.  Around noon, when the picture was taken, the clouds had developed a classic anvil shape. This flattening occurs when a building storm “bumps up” against the tropopause, effectively ceasing its vertical growth. Such cloud development is a common occurrence during the monsoon season over the southwest United States. From about mid July until early September, maritime tropical air from the Gulf of California and the Pacific Ocean is forced inland where its heated by the intense summer Sun. The resulting unstable atmosphere often leads to thunderstorm activity, especially if the vapor-laden air is lifted by upslope winds. Monsoon rains account for approximately one third of the annual rainfall in Phoenix, Arizona. The desert southwest is a wonderful place to watch monsoon storms develop through their various stages.”

http://epod.usra.edu/blog/2010/11/monsoon-anvil-in-arizona.html

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Storm Clouds Over Wickenburg

http://www.wickenburg-az.com/2007/07/storm-clouds-over-wickenburg/

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“Lightning streaks like gunfire through the clouds, volleys of thunder shake the air. ” – Edward Abbey

Monday May 28, 2012

May 28, 2012 § 2 Comments

 

A hero is someone who has given his or her life to something bigger than oneself. -Joseph Campbell

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Vietnam Veterans Memorial Boots Purple Heart

http://www.travelmuse.com/articles/general-features/veterans-day-sites-historical-vacation

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And I’m proud to be an American,
where at least I know I’m free.
And I won’t forget the men who died,
who gave that right to me. -Lee Greenwood

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Vietnam Memorial

http://brathwaitephoto.photoshelter.com/image/I0000rYPbNe6.s_A

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“The truth will set you free, but first it will piss you off.” – Gloria Steinem

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Aerial of Vietnam Veterans Memorial

http://www.vanityfair.com/politics/2012/04/maya-lin-vietnam-wall-memorial

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“The most important kind of freedom is to be what you really are. You trade in your reality for a role. You trade in your sense for an act. You give up your ability to feel, and in exchange, put on a mask. There can’t be any large-scale revolution until there’s a personal revolution, on an individual level. It’s got to happen inside first.” – Jim Morrison

Rest.

May 27, 2012 § 2 Comments

“The world rests in the night. Trees, mountains, fields, and faces are released from the prison of shape and the burden of exposure. Each thing creeps back into its own nature within the shelter of the dark. Darkness is the ancient womb. Nighttime is womb- time. Our souls come out to play. The darkness absolves everything; the struggle for identity and impression falls away. We rest in the night.” – John O’Donahue, “Anam Cara: A Book of Celtic Wisdom”.

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Evening Sky Reflects East Gallatin River

http://www.bozemandailychronicle.com/gallery/

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“Something amazing happens when the rest of the world is sleeping. I am glued to my chair. I forget that I ever wanted to do anything but write. The crowded city, the crowded apartment, and the crowded calendar suddenly seem spacious. Three or four hours pass in a moment; I have no idea what time it is, because I never check the clock. If I chose to listen, I could hear the swish of taxis bound for downtown bars or the soft saxophone riffs that drift from a neighbor’s window, but nothing gets through. I am suspended in a sensory deprivation tank, and the very lack of sensation is delicious.” – Anne Fadiman

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Dramatic evening sky

http://mountaindreamers.blogspot.com/2011_07_01_archive.html

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“I like the stars. It’s the illusion of permanence, I think. I mean, they’re always flaring up and caving in and going out. But from here, I can pretend…I can pretend that things last. I can pretend that lives last longer than moments….Worlds don’t last; and stars and galaxies are transient, fleeting things that twinkle like fireflies and vanish into cold and dust. But I can pretend…”  – Neil Gaiman

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Spruce Knob Night Sky

http://www.janniefunster.com/2011/10/04/while-youre-in-a-poetry-mood/

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“The spaces between stars are where the work of the universe is done.” – Ivan Doig, “The House of Sky; Landscapes of a Western Mind”.

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