Summer – Memories

June 30, 2012 § 1 Comment

 

Blue and Purple Hydrangeas Alongside Weathered, Gray Porch in Nantucket, Massachusetts- Matted 8×10 Print – Boston – New England – Fine Art

http://www.etsy.com/listing/101534375/blue-and-purple-hydrangeas-alongside?ref=tre-2720446043-5

* * *

Antique Copper Door Knobs, Face Plates, and Lock Case / Set of 20 / Salvaged 19th Century

http://www.etsy.com/listing/99633240/antique-copper-door-knobs-face-plates?ref=tre-2720446043-4

* * *

Gardening with Grandpa – Original Oil Painting on 18×24 Gallery Wrapped Canvas

http://www.etsy.com/listing/50901845/gardening-with-grandpa-original-oil?ref=tre-2720446043-14

* * *

Summer – Memories   Etsy Treasury:

http://www.etsy.com/treasury/NzA0NjQyMHwyNzIwNDQ2MDQz/summer-memories

* * *

 

Altitude.

June 29, 2012 § 2 Comments

“The sky is not my limit…I am.”  – T.F. Hodge

* * *

Wheeler Peak and Williams Lake Basin

At 13,161 feet above sea level, Wheeler Peak is the highest mountain in New Mexico, which ranks as the 8th state in order of elevation. Located in the Sangre De Cristo (Blood of Christ) range, it stands guard over the southern end of the Rocky Mountains

http://www.summitpost.org/wheeler-peak-nm/150429

 

The 50 highest peaks in New Mexico are all over 11,000 feet in elevation…

http://riverxchange.com/teachers-2/quick-facts-new-mexico-geography-climate-rio-grande/

* * *

Organ Mountains NM

http://drmrenfrew.wordpress.com/2011/03/27/organ-mountains-new-mexico/

* * *

Formerly named Taos Peak, after the nearby town of Taos, New Mexico, it was renamed Wheeler Peak in 1950. A plaque at the summit states that the mountain was:

“Named in honor of Major George Montague Wheeler (1832–1909) who for ten years led a party of surveyors and naturalists collecting geologic, biologic, planimetric and topographic data in New Mexico and six other southwestern states.”  —Wikipedia

http://newmexicooutdoor.com/Wheeler_Peak.html

* * *

wheeler peak wilderness sunset

http://my.opera.com/yoo_lucian/albums/showpic.dml?album=24954

Across Moreno Valley stands Wheeler Peak, 13,161 feet, highest peak in New Mexico. Rocks of Wheeler Peak and the Taos Range are highly resistant granites and gneisses of Precambrian age. Moreno Valley is underlain by soft sandstones and shales which are covered by stream and glacial deposits. Placer gold was mined at Elizabethtown north of here during the 1860’s.

http://www.hmdb.org/marker.asp?marker=45750

* * *

LostLakeTrail Wheeler Peak, NM

http://www.14ers.com/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=17901

* * *

Prospectors actively sought copper, gold and silver in the Sangre de Cristo Range, and from 1890 to 1910 copper was mined from the Bull of the Woods mine near Wheeler Peak. The copper occurs as malachite in a northeast-trending shear zone in Precambrian phyllite.

http://www.unh.edu/esci/geology-highpoints/new_mexico.html

* * *

Chihuahuan Desert Nature Park NM

http://zeesgowest.blogspot.com/2010_04_01_archive.html

* * *

“Human beings are the only creatures who are allowed to fail. If an ant fails, it’s dead. But we’re allowed to learn from our mistakes and from our failures. And that’s how I learn, by falling flat on my face and picking myself up and starting all over again.”  – Madeleine L’Engle

* * *

Wheeler Peak Wilderness Area

http://www.summitpost.org/users/alex-wood/42912

* * *

On peaks above 12,000 feet, like Wheeler (the state’s highest at 13,161 feet) and others in the Santa Fe and Enchanted Circle (Taos, Red River, Questa) areas, the Alpine Zone is home to pikas and marmots. This region accommodates few trees, except perhaps a few wind-twisted pines and wildflowers that bloom during a brief summer.

http://nmmagazine.com/geology.php

* * *

ContinentalDivide States

The Continental Divide runs through the entire length of New Mexico, closely following the path of the Rio Grande.  The Divide represents a major U.S. division of watersheds: all precipitation that falls to the west of the Divide eventually makes its way to the Pacific Ocean, while precipitation that falls to the east of the Divide makes its way to the Atlantic Ocean.

The diverse geology of the state provides terrain that includes six of the seven “life zones.”  A life zone is a belt of vegetation and animal life that appears with increases in altitude and increases in latitude.  With such a variation in landscapes, the animal and plant species also represent a vast range like no other on the planet.

http://riverxchange.com/teachers-2/quick-facts-new-mexico-geography-climate-rio-grande/

* * *

Organ Mountain

http://blog.picachomountain.com/las-cruces-new-mexico-ranks-amoung-the-top-10-best-performing-cities-in-the-us-for-the-second-year-in-a-row/#

* * *

Chuska Mountains run NNW to SSE Across Arizona and New Mexico Border

http://www.durangobill.com/PaleoAppendPart8.html

* * *

Chuska mountain range

… lies within the Navajo Reservation north of Gallup, New Mexico, to the west of highway 666. The range extends into northeast Arizona where the mountains become continuous with the Carrizo range. The tallest peak in the Chuskas is 9,400 feet and the elevation of most of the surrounding woodlands is between 8,000 and 9,000 feet. Geologically, the Chuska Mountains are a remnant plateau, which towers above the surrounding eroded landscape of the San Juan Basin. They were formed by ancient volcanic eruptions that covered the surrounding ubiquitous sandstone foundation with harder volcanic basalts. These basalts have resisted erosion while surrounding sandstone layers have not, leaving the tall sentinels of the Chuskas to stand above the surrounding desert. At their northernmost point, the Chuska and Carrizo ranges nearly connect with the San Juan range of the Rocky Mountains in southwest Colorado. At their southern end, they connect with the vast highlands of east central Arizona known as the Mogollon Rim. As such, they provide a relatively high, moist, wooded corridor between the Rocky Mountains and the broad wooded country of the Mogollon Rim. The Chuska range may serve as a migrational corridor connecting these two larger habitats.

http://www.bfro.net/avevid/nelson/chuska.asp

* * *

Snow Covered Wheeler Peak and Clouds

http://www.nps.gov/grba/photosmultimedia/Winter-Landscapes-Gallery.htm

* * *

Much of New Mexico is located in the Upper Chihuahuan Desert, which is colder than the Sonoran desert in Arizona.  The saguaro cactus — a symbol of the wild west — is rarely found in New Mexico due to prolonged freezing temperatures.  Well-known native plants include yucca, cholla cactus, prickly pear cactus, piñon pine, juniper, cottonwood (in riparian areas), and Ponderosa pine (in higher elevations).

http://riverxchange.com/teachers-2/quick-facts-new-mexico-geography-climate-rio-grande/

* * *

national monuments and state parks in the Southern Rocky Mountains

http://geoinfo.nmt.edu/tour/provinces/southern_rocky_mountains/home.html

 

* * *

GEOLOGY OF THE SANGRE DE CRISTO MOUNTAINS AND ADJACENT AREAS, BETWEEN TAOS AND RATON, NEW MEXICO:

http://nmgs.nmt.edu/publications/guidebooks/downloads/17/17_p0056_p0065.pdf

* * *

New Mexico Storm

http://www.vandanaphotography.com/Travel/New-Mexico/Images-from-New-Mexico/3150146_mCFx9v/839715580_VfANX#!i=839715580&k=VfANX

 

* * *

“Life was not longer something to endure, but to live. ” – Hubert Selby Jr.

* * *

Luminous

June 28, 2012 § Leave a comment

“We see what we want to see, not what is actually before our eyes. We look but we may not apprehend or comprehend. We may have to tune our seeing just as we tune an instrument, to increase its sensitivity, its range, its clarity, its empathy….if we wish to experience life fully, and take hold of it fully, we will need to train ourselves to see through or behind the appearances of things. We will need to cultivate intimacy with the stream of our thinking…”

– Kabat-Zinn, Jon. (2005). Coming to our senses: Healing ourselves and the world through mindfulness. New York: Hyperion.

* * *

Camping at Bluewater Lake State Park NM

http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/traveler-magazine/photo-contest/entries/64256/view/

* * *

“as soon as we allow ourselves to think of the world as alive, we recognize that a part of us knew this all along….we can begin to reconnect to our mental life with our own direct intuitive experiences of nature. we can participate in the spirits of sacred places and times. we can see that we have much to learn from traditional societies who have never lost their sense of connection with the living world around them. we can acknowledge the animistic traditions of our ancestors. and we can begin to develop a richer understanding of human nature, shaped by tradition and collective memory, linked to the earth and the heavens, related to all forms of life, and consciously open to the creative power expressed in all evolution. we are reborn into a living world.”  – sheldrake, r. (1991). the rebirth of nature: the greening of science and god. new york: bantam.

http://www.earthregenerative.org/gaiamethods/healing.html#quotations

* * *

* * *

bluewater lake state park sunset

http://www.thruhelenseyes.com/keyword/prewitt#!i=587614707&k=wTxSR

* * *

“if we want people to see this crumbled worldview for what it is, we have to block the only myth that makes it bearable, namely, the belief that human knowledge is sufficient to get us out of the holes we’ve dug for ourselves and the world. and so we are left with this: if we don’t get an alternative for the current knowledge-based worldview, then the changes we make to the other systems won’t matter much; they’ll be more like tinkering with the engines of an airplane that has run out of fuel while in flight. we call this view an ignorance-based worldview, and we predicate it on the assumption that human ignorance will always exceed and outpace human knowledge and, therefore, that before we make any decision or take any action, we must consider who and how many are involved, the level of cultural change that will be involved, and the chances of backing out if things go sour.” –  vitek, w., & jackson, w. (2008). the virtues of ignorance: complexity, sustainability, and the limits of knowledge. lexington, ky: university press of kentucky.

http://www.earthregenerative.org/gaiamethods/complexity.html#complexityquotations

* * *

* * *

North Altar, Zuni Mountain Sanctuary, NM

http://www.arthurdurkee.net/newmexico01.html

* * *

“Some ancient native traditions believe that the world feels our seeing, and sees us right back, even the trees and the bushes, even the rocks. And certainly, if you have ever spent a night alone in the rain forest or the woods, you will know that the quality of your seeing and of your being are felt and known by more than the human world. You will sense that you are definitely being seen and known as you really are…you are an intimate part of this animate and sensuous world.” –

– Kabat-Zinn, Jon. (2005). Coming to our senses: Healing ourselves and the world through mindfulness. New York: Hyperion.

http://www.earthregenerative.org/gaiamethods/reviews.html#blanket

* * *

El Morro National Monument by Adriel Heisey and Kjell Boersma

* * *

“Let us be silent, that we may hear the whispers of the gods.”  – Ralph Waldo Emerson

* * *

 

* * *

“Reverence arises when faced with the incomprehensible. And by incomprehensible, I don’t mean that something cannot be understood. I mean that whatever it is that we are attending to can be understood in many different ways. And yet, when all is said and done and we have come to the end of our thoughts, no matter how brilliant, imaginative, and informed, all our logic no matter how grounded in reason, all our studies, there is a residue of feeling that goes beyond thought altogether, as when transported by some marvelous strains of music, or when struck by the artistry of a great painting. A feeling of awe arises that transcends mere explanation. The actuality—whatever it is—hovers in the mystery of its very phenomenological presence in relationship to our senses, including the non-conceptual, apprehending, knowing mind…. We don’t have words for such numinous and luminous feelings, and often forget how prevalent they are in our experience….” – Kabat-Zinn, Jon. (2005). Coming to our senses: Healing ourselves and the world through mindfulness. New York: Hyperion.

http://www.earthregenerative.org/gaiamethods/reviews.html#blanket

Risk.

June 27, 2012 § 3 Comments

“Leap and the net will appear.” – Zen Saying

* * *

AZ_SaltRiverCanyon

http://www.ejphoto.com/salt_river_canyon_page.htm

* * *
You’ll always miss 100% of the shots you don’t take.  ~Wayne Gretzky

* * *

Pinetop AZ

http://www.heckofafamily.com/mike/?p=16

* * *

“Do one thing every day that scares you.” – Eleanor Roosevelt

* * *

Salt River Canyon near Pinetop

http://queenmimicorner.blogspot.com/2010/08/5-friends-5-days-in-mountain-cabin.html

* * *
“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did. So throw off the bowlines, sail away from the safe harbor, catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.” – Mark Twain

* * *

AZ_SaltRiverCanyon 2

http://www.ejphoto.com/salt_river_canyon_page.htm

* * *

Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far it is possible to go.” – T.S. Eliot

* * *

AZ_SaltRiverCanyon 3

http://www.ejphoto.com/salt_river_canyon_page.htm

* * *

And then the day came,
when the risk
to remain tight
in a bud
was more painful
than the risk
it took
to Blossom. – Anais Nin

* * *

White Mountains Sunset

http://imageofthedayblog.com/332/travel/image-of-the-day-1-18-12-sunset-in-the-white-mountains-of-arizona/

* * *

When in doubt, make a fool of yourself.  There is a microscopically thin line between being brilliantly creative and acting like the most gigantic idiot on earth.  So what the hell, leap.  ~Cynthia Heimel

* * *

White Mountain

Located 180 miles northeast of Phoenix and Tucson, the White Mountain Region offers diverse climate and topography. The northern part of the region offers sweeping ranchland, while the southern portion of the region is host to the largest stand of Ponderosa Pine in North America.

http://www.wmrdc.org/mount.html

* * *

“If you want a guarantee, buy a toaster.”  – Clint Eastwood

* * *

“When you walk to the edge of all the light you have and take that first step into the darkness of the unknown, you must believe that one of two things will happen. There will be something solid for you to stand upon or you will be taught to fly.”  – Patrick Overton

* * *

Hopi.

June 25, 2012 § 2 Comments

“We are the ones we’ve been waiting for.” – attributed to a Hopi Elder, Hopi Nation, Oraibi, Arizona

http://www.communityworks.info/hopi.htm

* * *

Summer-Rains-Hopi

http://tombrownold.photoshelter.com/image/I0000sftee61aij4

* * *

“The Hopi, an Indian tribe, have a language as sophisticated as ours, but no tenses for past, present and future. The division does not exist. What does this say about time?” – Jeanette Winterson

* * *

hopi reservation

DESERT GEOMETRY (Hopi Reservation, AZ) – Strange shapes and brilliant colors on the floor of a remote canyon in northeast Arizona.

http://www.rickgoldwasserphotography.com/Northern-Arizona/Arizona-in-Stone/5020288_5g83Dg/937756626_5h8Rn#!i=937756626&k=5h8Rn

* * *

The Hopi Mesas are three mesas, relatively near each other, roughly northeast of Flagstaff and southwest of Chinle – Arizona. They are quite literally in the middle of nowhere, while the entire Hopi Reservation itself is surrounded on all sides by the Navajo/Apache Indians. The Hopi Mesas are the homeland of the Hopi, the “divine” destination of the wandering tribes of the Ancestral Puebloans. The “real” Centre of the World is Tuuwanasavi, a few miles from the village of Oraibi. It was the Bear Clan that was the first to complete their four migrations and, arriving from Mesa Verde, they settled on Second Mesa. Still, Oraibi, the settlement on the Third Mesa, is today seen as the oldest town in Northern America, as it has seen continuous inhabitation since it was occupied.

http://www.philipcoppens.com/hopi.html

* * *

Hopi Buttes near Dilkon AZ

http://esp.cr.usgs.gov/hopibuttes/

* * *

“The Hopi still make annual pilgrimages (which are linked with their festivals) on foot from their mesas, 65 miles east, to shrines hidden in the mountains. Upon the winter solstice, the deities are then said to depart from the mountains – as rain clouds – and come to live with the Hopi on the mesas. After the harvest – in early July – they return to their mountain resort. 

Though a lot of attention has been drawn to the San Francisco Peaks as the residence of the deities, in truth, they are but one of four “Cloud Houses”, residences of the gods, which are the four highest points around Oraibi, each one in a different direction. Another sacred hill is Hard Rock Mountain or Navajo Mountain in Southeastern Utah. Four migrations, four cardinal points… four sacred mountains.” – Phil Coppens

http://www.philipcoppens.com/hopi.html

*  * *

hopi_walpi

http://www.philipcoppens.com/hopi.html

* * *

Most of the Ancestral Puebloans villages were cliff dwellings, set into the sheer cliff face of canyons. It is clear that these were less than ideal settings from a mundane perspective, especially in the – cold – winters. Archaeologists will argue that they had certain defensive advantages, but this single benefit clearly does not outweigh the disadvantages. One such site is Hovenweep National Monument. This is a cliff dwelling that for archaeologists is a “late burst” of the Ancestral Puebloans shortly before they disappeared, whereas within a migration framework, it is a settlement of the final migration of a clan, before heading for the Hopi Mesas. At Hovenweep, the tall towers are considered by archaeologists to have functioned as astronomical observatories and it underlines the Hopi mythology that the cycle of migrations was linked with the constellations – on their travels, they were guided by the stars.   – Phil Coppens

http://www.philipcoppens.com/hopi.html

* * *

Pecusas’ cornfield, Hopi Reservation

http://www.cdsporch.org/archives/389

* * *

Hopi Orion

http://www.philipcoppens.com/hopi.html

* * *

“…the three Hopi Mesas can overlap the three stars of Orion’s Belt, with other key Ancestral Puebloan sites corresponding to other stars of this constellation – and neighbouring stars: Chaco Canyon coincides with Sirius. Orion itself is made up (amongst others) from the Betatakin Ruin in Tsegi Canyon and Keet Seel Ruin as representing the double star Rigel, the left foot or knee of Orion; Homol’ovi Ruins State Park is Betelgeuse, while Wupatki is Bellatrix and Canyon de Chelly Saiph. Even the Sipapu in the Grand Canyon is mapped, and corresponds with Pi 3 Ori. Orion’s Belt is therefore sacred to the Hopi, the “Centre of the World”. – Philip Coppens

* * *

Remote Corner Hopi Res Night Sky

“CANYON COSMOS” – A meteor streaks across the starry sky during the Perseid meteor shower with the Milky Way in the background in a remote corner of the Hopi Reservation in Arizona.

http://www.rickgoldwasserphotography.com/Northern-Arizona/Arizona-in-Stone/5020288_5g83Dg/1009269874_UPVB4#!i=1009269874&k=UPVB4

* * *

“If you drilled from Hopiland through the center of the earth, you would exit in Tibet, another sacred culture situated on a high and dry plateau.  Certain words in the Hopi and Tibetan language have reversed meanings – for instance, the Hopi word for day, “Nyma,” is the Tibetan word for night….” – Daniel Pinchbeck, Source: 2012: The Return of Quetzalcoatl, Pages: 382.

* * *

Cape Solitude.

June 24, 2012 § Leave a comment

“Anything we fully do is an alone journey.”  – Natalie Goldberg

* * *

GC Beyond Desert View Old Road

http://www.downthetrail.com/overnight-hike-to-cape-solitude/

* * *

“I have to be alone very often. I’d be quite happy if I spent from Saturday night until Monday morning alone in my apartment. That’s how I refuel.” – Audrey Hepburn

* * *

Cape Solitude GC

http://www.downthetrail.com/overnight-hike-to-cape-solitude/

* * *

“Silent solitude makes true speech possible and personal. If I am not in touch with my own belovedness, then I cannot touch the sacredness of others. If I am estranged from myself, I am likewise a stranger to others.”  – Brennan Manning

* * *

Chuar Butte – this also happens to be the area of an airline collsion in 1956. At the time it was the deadliest accident in aviation history, and led to the creation of the FAA.

http://www.downthetrail.com/overnight-hike-to-cape-solitude/

* * *

“Work is not always required. There is such a thing as sacred idleness.”  – George MacDonald

* * *

Cape Solitude Grand Canyon

http://www.downthetrail.com/overnight-hike-to-cape-solitude/

* * *

“Guard well your spare moments. They are like uncut diamonds. Discard them and their value will never be known. Improve them and they will become the brightest gems in a useful life.”  – Ralph Waldo Emerson

* * *

View from Desert View at the Grand Canyon

http://www.douglasdolde.com/index.php#mi=2&pt=1&pi=10000&s=1&p=3&a=0&at=0

* * *

“The more powerful and original a mind, the more it will incline towards the religion of solitude.”  – Aldous Huxley

* * *

Colorado River from Cape Solitude

http://probstphoto.photoshelter.com/image/I0000RMga3VO5PUA

* * *

“Cherish your solitude. Take trains by yourself to places you have never been. Sleep out alone under the stars. Learn how to drive a stick shift. Go so far away that you stop being afraid of not coming back. Say no when you don’t want to do something. Say yes if your instincts are strong, even if everyone around you disagrees. Decide whether you want to be liked or admired. Decide if fitting in is more important than finding out what you’re doing here. Believe in kissing.”  – Eve Ensler

* * *

View S towards Cape Solitude

View S towards Cape Solitude, the large promintory on the southeast side of the confluence between the Colorado River and Little Colorado River

http://www.physci.mc.maricopa.edu/Geology/FieldTrips/ColoradoRiver/2004Summer/ColoradoRiver_su04_Images_Day03.htm

* * *

“But there is greater comfort in the substance of silence than in the answer to a question.”  – Thomas Merton

* * *

Cape Solitude and the Little Colorado

* * *

“Loneliness is the poverty of self; solitude is richness of self.”  – May Sarton

* * *

Phantom Creek

http://www.downthetrail.com/hiking-upstream-in-phantom-creek-and-the-miners-route/

* * *

“We live, in fact, in a world starved for solitude, silence, and private: and therefore starved for meditation and true friendship.”  – C. S. Lewis

* * *

Lower Miners Route GC

http://www.downthetrail.com/hiking-upstream-in-phantom-creek-and-the-miners-route/

* * *

“Let me tell you this: if you meet a loner, no matter what they tell you, it’s not because they enjoy solitude. It’s because they have tried to blend into the world before, and people continue to disappoint them.”  – Jodi Picoult

* * *

Lower Miners Route GC 2

http://www.downthetrail.com/hiking-upstream-in-phantom-creek-and-the-miners-route/

* * *

“Solitude produces originality, bold and astonishing beauty, poetry. But solitude also produces perverseness, the disproportianate, the absurd and the forbidden.”  – Thomas Mann

* * *

Lower Miners Route GC Deer

http://www.downthetrail.com/hiking-upstream-in-phantom-creek-and-the-miners-route/

* * *

“As soon as we are alone,…inner chaos opens up in us. This chaos can be so disturbing and so confusing that we can hardly wait to get busy again. Entering a private room and shutting the door, therefore, does not mean that we immediatel;y shut ou all our iner doubts, anxieities, fears, bad memories, unresolved conflicts, angry feelings and impulsive desires. On the contrary, when we have removed our outer distraction, we often find that our inner distraction manifest themselves to us in full force. We often use the outer distractions to shield ourselves from the interior noises. This makes the discipline of solitude all the more important.”  – Henri J.M. Nouwen

* * *

Desolation Canyon.

June 23, 2012 § Leave a comment

“We must be willing to let go of the life we planned so as to have the life that is waiting for us.” – Joseph Campbell

* * *

Southwest Archaeology

http://www.grandcanyontrust.org/news/2012/05/enjoy-archaeology-a-letter-from-our-friends-at-colorado-plateau-archaeological-alliance/

Desolation Canyon in eastern Utah is also a largely undiscovered archaeological treasure worthy of its designation as a National Historic Landmark. For thousands of years, humans have moved up and down the Green River through impenetrable cliffs and Gothic spires, pursuing bighorn sheep, elk and deer, and gathering together a rich harvest of seeds and berries growing along the tributary creeks. A thousand years ago, some of them – archaeologists call them the Fremont people – even stayed long enough to plant and cultivate maize along the river banks, building stone-and-adobe granaries in the cliffs and becoming the first to put down roots in this forbidding landscape. They did not stay long, maybe a generation or two. Today, only the abandoned relics and ruins of long-vanished people greet the thousands of visitors who float the nearly 90 miles from Sand Wash to Green River every year.

http://www.cparch.org/documents/37.html

http://www.cparch.org/

* * *

Example of a “Museum Rock” located in an alcove site in Canyonlands National Park.

http://visitingtheancients.com/blog/2010/04/cliff-dwellings-alcoves-potsherds-and-museum-rocks/

* * *

Southwest Archaeology:

http://thenaturalamerican.com/southwest_archaeology.htm

*  *  *

Desolation Canyon Satellite

http://news.science360.gov/obj/pic-day/0c82a16a-a91d-4409-bc49-bf417a043b97

Nearly as deep as the Grand Canyon, Desolation Canyon is one of the largest unprotected wilderness areas in the American West.

* * *

badlands near Sand Wash in Desolation Canyon

http://www.suwa.org/2012/04/11/last-week-to-help-save-desolation-canyon/

Help protect this wilderness:

http://www.suwa.org/2012/06/

* * *

Archaeologists know very little about the people who lived in Desolation Canyon, how they adapted to this remarkable wilderness or what eventually happened to them. Because of its rugged isolation, it has been extremely difficult and expensive for scientists to get into Desolation Canyon to study the remains of past cultures. Beginning in 1931, archaeologists had from time to time ventured into the canyon, but rarely did they write detailed accounts of what they saw. And not until CPAA’s first expedition in 2006 did archaeologists from throughout the region come together to study the canyon in a comprehensive manner. Today, about 75 sites have been documented along the canyon corridor, and for the first time federal managers have the information they need to proactively manage these sites for their long-term protection.

http://www.cparch.org/desolation_canyon_project.htm

* * *

Stream Desolation Canyon

http://laughingfish.blogspot.com/2011/01/desolation-canyon.html

* * *

“I think I’ve discovered the secret of life — you just hang around until you get used to it.”  – Charles M. Schultz

* * *

Desolation Canyon Location Map

http://laughingfish.blogspot.com/2010/11/desolation-canyon.html

* * *

“Sometimes, if you stand on the bottom rail of a bridge and lean over to watch the river slipping slowly away beneath you, you will suddenly know everything there is to be known.”  – A.A. Milne

* * *

 

Save Desolation Canyon

http://www.suwa.org/2012/04/11/last-week-to-help-save-desolation-canyon/

* * *

“There comes a point when you either embrace who and what you are, or condemn yourself to be miserable all your days. Other people will try to make you miserable; don’t help them by doing the job yourself.”  – Laurell Hamilton

* * *

Desolation Canyon Rock and Pebbles

http://www.hanselmannphotography.com/AllThumbPages/favoritepictures2.html

* * *

“If you’re reading this…
Congratulations, you’re alive.
If that’s not something to smile about,
then I don’t know what is.”  – Chad Sugg

* * *

Book Cliffs Desolation Canyon

Book Cliffs Desolation Canyon proposed wilderness.

http://action.suwa.org/site/PhotoAlbumUser?view=UserPhotoDetail&PhotoID=29809&position=6&AlbumID=7397

* * *

“The simple things are also the most extraordinary things, and only the wise can see them.”  – Paul Coelho, “The Alchemist”

* * *

Desolation Perfection Eastern Utah – Fremont Granary 700 A.D. to 1200 A.D. Desolation Canyon

Granaries located in the high cliffs of Eastern Utah, notably Nine Mile Canyon and Range Creek, are defensively positioned. This granary faces what is not legally designated, but is, a “wild and scenic river.”

Literally this granary is a perfect piece of rock art. Notice the circular light on the ground adjacent to the granary. A round overhead stone is moved to allow visitors to enter this alcove through the roof.

Now, the sun shines through the hole. Once inside the alcove, we face the Green River winding through the twisted ravines of Desolation Canyon.

Outside the alcove, the noon sun glares. We sit in the cool shadows in perfect peace. Indeed, Desolation Perfection. I notice faint needle-thin zigzag lines carved on the edge of the alcove. Are these a possible tribute to rain?

Desolation Canyon was and is a formidable gorge to transverse. Yet, here, Fremont farmers built this granary to store their harvest. In nearby Range Creek and Nine Mile Canyon, granaries were placed in locations which we now regard as inaccessible. The rock art in those canyons documents warfare between tribal people, fighting with every sort of primitive weapon. This perfect granary evidences the great struggle to survive a thousand years ago in the midst of these vertical rock walls.

Today there is another struggle in Desolation Canyon, a struggle to preserve this river wilderness. A rush to develop natural gas resources on the Tavaputs plateau and in the Uintah basin may destroy what is undesignated but truly deserves to be a “wild and scenic river.” – Diane Orr

http://www.dianeorr.com/gallery/utah/desolation-perfection.html

* * *

“The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing.”  – Socrates

* *


Where Am I?

You are currently viewing the archives for June, 2012 at SouthwestDesertLover.