Balance.

June 20, 2012 § Leave a comment

“If we are always arriving and departing, it is also
true that we are eternally anchored. One’s destination
is never a place but rather a new way of looking at things.”  – Henry Miller

 

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Havasu Creek Colorado River

http://www.pbase.com/tnarwid/image/133517064

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“It has always been a happy thought to me that the creek runs on all night, new every minute, whether I wish it or know it or care, as a closed book on a shelf continues to whisper to itself its own inexhaustible tale. So many things have been shown so to me on these banks, so much light has illumined me by reflection here where the water comes down, that I can hardly believe that this grace never flags, that the pouring from ever-renewable sources is endless, impartial, and free.”  – Annie Dillard

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Havasu Creek from trail

http://www.djibnet.com/photo/al_hikesaz/havasu-creek-from-trail-grand-canyon-3692211838.html

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“The world beyond the water was a blue of green and stone and blue. A moment later Yoshi pushed through, the water pouring down in sheets so smooth it looked like glass, and stepped into the calm…” – Kim Edwards

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Havasu Creek and trail

http://blog.grandcanyonwhitewater.com/blog/river-trip-highlights/loved-the-blue-waters-of-havasu-creek

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“…have poets write about you as if you are alive. Scientifically, it is absolutely true, you are alive. You have a pulse, the waves, and a metabolism, the food chain. A personality, a character, a consciousness, and a sense of purpose…try this- turn into spray, spin rainbows…wear down entire mountains and dump them in layers…gently surround marina sea grass twice a day, protecting and feeding thousands of crabs, ducks, and geese…fill human eyes with warm salt brine at least once a month… Becoming Water”  – Susan Zwinger

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Havasu Creek Fine Art Photograph by Olof Carmel

http://www.thecarmelgallery.com/Havasu-Creek-p/osw113.htm

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“Water does not resist. Water flows. When you plunge your hand into it, all you feel is a caress. Water is not a solid wall, it will not stop you. But water always goes where it wants to go, and nothing in the end can stand against it. Water is patient. Dripping water wears away a stone. Remember that, my child. Remember you are half water. If you can’t go through an obstacle, go around it. Water does.”  – Margaret Atwood

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Havasu Creek starts out above the canyon wall as a small trickle of snow

http://gordondonovan.com/?p=3565

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The air was the blue of a pool when there are shadows, when clouds cross the turquoise surface, when you suspect something contagious is leaking, something camouflaged and disrupted. There is only this infected blue enormity, elongating defiantly. The blue that knows you and where you live and it’s never going to forget.”  – Kate Braverman

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Grand Canyon Havasu Creek

http://stanford-gibson.blogspot.com/2012/04/grand-canyon-part-1-photos.html

* * *

“… the river sliding along its banks, darker now than the sky descending a last time to scatter its diamonds into these black waters that contain the day that passed, the night to come.
— Excerpt from the poem “The Mercy”  – Philip Levine

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Travertine Deposits of Havasu Falls – Supai, AZ

http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WME7V5_Travertine_Deposits_of_Havasu_Falls_Supai_AZ

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The Havasu Creek Watershed (also known as the Havasu Canyon Watershed, the Cataract Creek Watershed, or the Havasu Cataract Watershed) is a large area that is geographically and socially diverse. The watershed is primarily rural with 40.12% private land, 28.18% State Trust land, and 20.67% Kaibab National Forest. The remaining land is managed by the Havasupai and Hualapai Tribes, the National Park Service, and small portion by Coconino National Forest. The Havasupai Tribe controls 8.18% of the land, but actions on the entire watershed affect their lands. The watershed is 2966 square miles (ADEQ 2005), and all of it drains into the creek that runs through the village of Supai where over 500 Havasupai people (“the people of the blue-green waters”) live and at least 10,000 tourists visit annually (Martin 1990, Melis et al. 1996). Havasu Creek is the second largest tributary of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park. The watershed is rich in natural, cultural, and biological resources.

http://www.landsward.nau.edu/document_forms/havasu_creek/Havasu%20Creek%20Watershed%20Scoping%20Project%20Final%20Report.pdf

* * *

behind Rock Falls, Havasu Creek

http://www.profimedia.si/picture/behind-rock-falls-havasu-creek-havasupai-reservation/0081719910/

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“Water, like religion and ideology, has the power to move millions of people. Since the very birth of human civilization, people have moved to settle close to it. People move when there is too little of it. People move when there is too much of it. People journey down it. People write, sing and dance about it. People fight over it. And all people, everywhere and every day, need it.”  – Mikhail Gorbechev

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View northeast and upstream just below the mouth of Havasu Creek.

http://www.physci.mc.maricopa.edu/Geology/FieldTrips/ColoradoRiver/ColoradoRiver_2006_Summer/ColoradoRiver_2006_Summer_Day07_Frameset.htm

The inner gorge of the Grand Canyon, the final destination of Havasu Creek, exposes the remains of a two-billion-year-old mountain range once as tall as the Himalayas. Wind and rain wore it flat. Uplifts created another mountain range in its place. Once again, relentless erosion reduced it to a flat plane. Then ocean waves lapped at the shores for another eon and deposited 3,000 feet of sediments. The strata beside the desert trail entomb the bodies of billions of microscopic sea creatures.

http://www.desertusa.com/mag99/dec/stories/havasufall.html

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Geology of Mojave County:

http://extension.arizona.edu/sites/extension.arizona.edu/files/resourcefile/resource/vacoombs/geologyandwaterresourcesofmohavecounty.pdf

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