Geographic poetry.

July 1, 2012 § 4 Comments

“The purpose of poetry is to remind us
how difficult it is to remain just one person,
for our house is open, there are no keys in the doors,
and invisible guests come in and out at will.”  – Czeslaw Milosz

* * *

San Juan River Upstream from CO River

San Juan River meanders just upstream from the Colorado River, UT. Valley flooded by Powell Reservoir.

http://www.geology.wisc.edu/~maher/air/air04.htm

* * *

While you’re in the Valley of the Gods area, stop at Goosenecks State Park. The paved road leads to an overlook of a deep canyon carved by the San Juan River, with a little help from nature’s erosive forces. Although the San Juan flows for five miles in the canyon, the many twists and turns result in only one mile of westward progress for the river.

http://thevacationgals.com/travel-to-se-utah-beyond-monument-valley/

* * *

Outlying mesas south of Mesa Verde

http://www.geology.wisc.edu/~maher/air/air04.htm

* * *

Geology by Lightplane:  http://www.geology.wisc.edu/~maher/air/air00.htm

* * *

“Like a sculptor, if necessary,
carve a friend out of stone.
Realize that your inner sight is blind
and try to see a treasure in everyone.”  – Rumi

* * *

East limb of anticline along San Juan River east of Mexican Hat, UT.

http://www.geology.wisc.edu/~maher/air/air04.htm

 

* * *

“Poetry is the liquid voice that can wear through stone.”  – Adrienne Rich

* * *

Monument Valley in the Distance, Muley Point in Foreground

http://www.philiphyde.com/index.php#mi=2&pt=1&pi=10000&s=15&p=4&a=0&at=0

* * *

“Still round the corner there may wait
A new road or a secret gate
And though I oft have passed them by
A day will come at last when I
Shall take the hidden paths that run
West of the Moon, East of the Sun.” – J.R.R. Tolkien

* * *

San Juan Region-Canyonland Region

The San Juan Region-Canyonland Region occupies the southeast corner of the state, where Utah touches Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona.

http://www.utahwilderness.org/map/san-juan-canyonlands-region/

 

* * *

“Poetry is eternal graffiti written in the heart of everyone.”  – Lawrence Ferlingghetti

* * *

Great Bend of the San Juan River from above

http://www.expeditionportal.com/forum/threads/60539-Hole-in-the-Rock-Adventure-2010

* * *

“You might as well ask an artist to explain his art, or ask a poet to explain his poem. It defeats the purpose. The meaning is only clear thorough the search.”  – Rick Rioran

* * *

The Mokee Dugway is located on Utah Route 261 just north of Mexican Hat, UT.

It was constructed in 1958 by Texas Zinc, a mining company, to transport uranium ore from the “Happy Jack” mine in Fry Canyon, UT. to the processing mill in Mexican Hat. The three miles of unpaved, but well graded, switchbacks descend 1100 feet from the top of Cedar Mesa (on which you are now standing). The State of Utah recommends that only vehicles less than 28 feet in length and 10,000 pounds in weight attempt to negotiate this steep (10% grade), narrow and winding road.

http://www.sanjuansafari.com/page.php?p=75

 

* * *

“Don’t use the phone. People are never ready to answer it. Use poetry.”  – Jack Kerouac

 

* * *

Mokee Dugway Twists and Turns

http://www.roadtripamerica.com/forum/content.php?273-monument-valley-arizona-to-blanding-utah

* * *

“To be nobody but
yourself in a world
which is doing its best day and night to make you like
everybody else means to fight the hardest battle
which any human being can fight and never stop fighting.”  – e.e. cummings

* * *

Moki Dugway October 2008

http://saabi1966.blogspot.com/2008/10/moki-dough-way-uta-october-13-2008.html

* * *’

“The Road Not Taken

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.”  – Robert Frost

* * *

To ascend the plateau, a unique trail has been chiseled out of the face of the cliff, using long traverses and tight switchbacks to reach the top. Built in 1958 to access uranium mines on the mesa, the Moki (also sometimes spelled Moqui) Dugway offers spectacular views of the surrounding area.

To ascend the plateau, a unique trail has been chiseled out of the face of the cliff, using long traverses and tight switchbacks to reach the top. Built in 1958 to access uranium mines on the mesa, the Moki (also sometimes spelled Moqui) Dugway offers spectacular views of the surrounding area.

The term Moki Dugway refers to handholds and steps carved into cliff ledges by ancestral puebloan people whose culture once thrived in the region.. In similar fashion Mormon pioneers who subsequently settled this rugged land improved these ancient paths to create passages, enabling wagons and livestock to reach remote areas.

At the top of the dugway, the views are breathtaking. To the east, Comb Ridge and Valley of the Gods lie below. Even farther out the dark silhouettes of the Rocky Mountains appear on the horizon. The southern view reveals the monoliths of Monument Valley, and even further southeast to Shiprock in New Mexico.

http://thejourneyofseldomseen.blogspot.com/2009/10/moki-dugway-and-cedar-mesa.html

* * *

More photos:  http://www.teresco.org/pics/fourcorners-20030926-27/26/utah261.html

* * *

 

Southeast Utah Map Moki Dugway

http://fruitflieslikeabanaba.wordpress.com/2010/05/02/day-3-ut-12-24-arches-n-p-and-moki-dugway/

* * *

“Poetry and art and knowledge are sacred and pure.”  – George Eliot

* * *

Storm over Moki Dugway

http://www.flickriver.com/photos/tags/moki/interesting/

* * *

DRIVE DOWN MOKI DUGWAY ROUTE 261 SAN JUAN UTAH 6-14-11 PART 1

* * *

 

“How happy is the little stone
That rambles in the road alone,
And doesn’t care about careers,
And exigencies never fears;
Whose coat of elemental brown
A passing universe put on;
And independent as the sun,
Associates or glows alone,
Fulfilling absolute decree
In casual simplicity.”  – Emily Dickinson

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§ 4 Responses to Geographic poetry.

  • That road looks amazing and the video makes it look quite scary in places!

    • southwestdesertlover says:

      The road is a dirt and rocks one with no guardrail, so it is definitely a very slow drive down. I’ve done this drive twice and the views are even more amazing in person. My second Boxer was named Moqui after places with this name in the southwest. :^)

  • sandy says:

    You titled this perfectly. Amazing!

  • southwestdesertlover says:

    Thank you so much Sandy. I really appreciate your taking the time. :^) Sometimes there is a delightful synchronicity when I digitally sculpt the day’s posting. I just love your blog – your posts are soul-food!

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