Synapse.

January 14, 2013 § Leave a comment

“The facts of nature are what they are, but we can only view them through the spectacles of our mind. Our mind works largely by metaphor and comparison, not always (or often) by relentless logic. When we are caught in conceptual traps, the best exit is often a change in metaphor — not because the new guideline will be truer to nature (for neither the old nor the new metaphor lies “out there” in the woods), but because we need a shift to more fruitful perspectives, and metaphor is often the best agent of conceptual transition.” ― Stephen Jay Gould, Bully for Brontosaurus: Reflections in Natural History

 

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Warner Mountain Crest

Warner Mountain Crest

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“Emotional baggage,” which is carried over from the past, colors our perceptions. Likewise, past conclusions and beliefs, based on reasoning that may or may not have been accurate, also tint our perception of reality. Retaining our capacity for reason is common sense, but definite conclusions and beliefs keep us from seeing life as it really is at any given moment.

Emotional reactions can be unreasonable, and reason can be flawed. It’s difficult to have deep confidence in either one, especially when they’re often at war with each other. But the universal mind exists in the instant, in a moment beyond time, and it sees the universe as it literally is. It’s the universe perceiving itself. It is, moreover, something we can have absolute confidence in, and with that confidence, we can maintain a genuinely positive attitude.” ― H.E. Davey, Japanese Yoga: The Way of Dynamic Meditation

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Warren, Doublet and Dinwoody Peaks

Warren, Doublet and Dinwoody Peaks

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“Material things have closed boundaries; they are not accessible, cannot be penetrated, by things outside themselves. But one’s existence as a spiritual being involves being and remaining oneself and at the same time admitting and transforming into oneself the reality of the world. No other material thing can be present in the space occupied by a house, a tree, or a fountain pen. But where there is mind, the totality of things has room; it is “possible that in a single being the comprehensiveness of the whole universe may dwell.” ― Josef Pieper, Happiness and Contemplation

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 Castle Peak

Castle Peak

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“There is a looming chasm between what your brain knows and what your mind is capable of accessing.” ― David Eagleman, Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain

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Deadwood Peak

Deadwood Peak

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“Each action we take is an act of self-expression. We often think of large-scale or important deeds as being indications of our real selves, but even how we sharpen a pencil can reveal something about our feelings at that moment. Do we sharpen the pencil carefully or nervously so that it doesn’t break? Do we bother to pay attention to what we’re doing? How do we sharpen the same pencil when we’re angry or in a hurry? Is it the same as when we’re calm or unhurried?

Even the smallest movement discloses something about the person executing the action because it is the person who’s actually performing the deed. In other words, action doesn’t happen by itself, we make it happen, and in doing so we leave traces of ourselves on the activity. The mind and body are interrelated.” ― H.E. Davey, Japanese Yoga: The Way of Dynamic Meditation

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Deadwood Peak

Deadwood Peak

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“We have created a mindset in our society where everyone wants what they want when they want it. And if we don’t get what we want when we want it, we feel ripped off. To make matters worse, we intensify our problems by continuously rehashing our woe-is-me story to the entire world. Whatever it is that has the potential to keep you from enjoying the day, understand that it’s not the situation itself that is causing you to be unhappy. It’s your thoughts and how you allow them to control you. It’s what you choose to focus on that fuels your emotions and defines your reality.” ― Steve Rizzo

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