Word.

March 18, 2013 § Leave a comment

“…speaking itself as a form of behavior that can be mindful or callous, truthful or dishonest, in the face if a sentient cosmos.  Spoken words here are real presences , entities that may be cherished …or flung carelessly into the world.  These phrases….provide evidence not only of a different way of seeing, but also of a way of speaking very different from to which so many of us are accustomed.” –  David Abram

* * *

Hualapai Peak from I-40W

Hualapai Peak from I-40W

http://www.panoramio.com/photo/55172226

* * *

“The practice of language among indigenous peoples would seem to carry a very different significance than it does in the modern west.  Enacted primarily in song, prayer and story, among oral peoples language functions not simply to dialogue with other humans but also to converse with the more-than-human cosmos, to renew reciprocity with the surrounding powers of earth and sky, to invoke kinship even with those entities which, to the civilized mind, are utterly insentient and inert.  Hence, a Lakota medicine person may address a stone as “Tunkashila” – “grandfather”.”  – David Abram

* * *

Wabayuma Peak Wilderness

Wabayuma Peak Wilderness

http://www.sangres.com/arizona/blm/wabayumapeak.htm#.UUZlnhe-okw

* * *

“….words do not speak about the world; rather they speak to the world and the expressive presences that, with us, inhabit the world.  In multiple and diverse ways, taking a unique form in each indigenous culture, spoken language seems to give voice to and thus enhance and accentuate, the sensorial affinity  between humans and the environing earth.” – David Abram

* * *

Wabayuma Peak

Wabayuma Peak

http://www.summitpost.org/wabayuma-peak/718790

*  * *

“Merleau-Ponty’s view of language as a thoroughly incarnate medium, of speech as rhythm and expressive gesture, and hence of spoken words and phrases as active sensuous presences afoot in the material landscape…goes a long way toward helping us understand the primacy of language and word magic in native rituals of transformation, metamorphosis and healing.” – David Abram

* * *

Hualapai near Kingman, AZ

Hualapai near Kingman, AZ

http://www.willhiteweb.com/arizona_climbing/kingman/cherum_peak_091.htm

* * *

“Writing, like human language, is engendered not only within the human community but between the human community and and the animate landscape, born of the interplay and contact between the human and the more-than-human world.  The earthly terrain upon which we find ourselves, and upon which we depend for all our nourishment, is shot through with suggestive scrawls and traces, with the sinuous calligraphy of rivers winding across the land, inscribing arroyos and canyons into the parched earth of the desert, to the black slash burned by lightning into the trunk of an old elm.  The swooping flight of birds is a kind of cursive script written on the wind;  it is this script that was studied by the ancient “augurs” who could read therein the course for the future.” – David Abram

* * *

Humphrey’s Peak

Humphrey’s Peak

As Sacred Peaks for the Hopi, Navajo, Hualapai, Yavapai, Zuni, Southern Paiute, Acoma and five Apache tribes; the Peaks are named by the Native Americans as: Nuva’tuk-iya-ovi (Place of High Snows) {Hopi}; Dook’o’oslid (Shining on Top) or Diichili Dzil (Abalone Shell Mountain {Navajo}.  These Peaks mark the southwestern-most boundary of the Dineta’s homeland.

The San Francisco Peaks were so names for the Patron Saint St. Francis of Assisi, by Spanish Franciscan Friars during their missionary work with the Native Americans in 1629.

Humphrey’s Peak was named in the mid-1880′s for Brigadier General Andrew Atkinson Humphreys who, during the Civil War, interpreted the survey information of the area which was collected by various previous expeditions.  He most likely never saw the San Francisco Peaks.

http://wildernessdave.com/tag/humphreys-peak/

* * *

 

 

Advertisements

Tagged: , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

What’s this?

You are currently reading Word. at SouthwestDesertLover.

meta

%d bloggers like this: