ease.

January 31, 2017 § Leave a comment

“To ease another’s heartache is to forget one’s own.”- Abraham Lincoln

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anza-borrego

http://www.desertusa.com/anza_borrego/du-abpmain.html

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“Never throughout history has a man who lived a life of ease left a name worth remembering.” – Theodore Roosevelt

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vcw_d_anza_hero_miguel-vieira_14619272047_817d665852_o_1280x642

Anza-Borrego Desert State Park

http://www.visitcalifornia.com/destination/spotlight-anza-borrego-desert-state-park

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“There is no time for ease and comfort. It is the time to dare and endure.”- Winston Churchill

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anza-borrego-desert-state-park-4f5e24d746d09d675b000c8e

http://www.californiabeaches.com/attraction/anza-borrego-desert-state-park/

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“Journeys are the midwives of thought. Few places are more conducive to internal conversations than a moving plane, ship or train. There is an almost quaint correlation between what is in front of our eyes and the thoughts we are able to have in our heads: large thoughts at times requiring large views, new thoughts new places. Introspective reflections which are liable to stall are helped along by the flow of the landscape. The mind may be reluctant to think properly when thinking is all it is supposed to do.

At the end of hours of train-dreaming, we may feel we have been returned to ourselves – that is, brought back into contact with emotions and ideas of importance to us. It is not necessarily at home that we best encounter our true selves. The furniture insists that we cannot change because it does not; the domestice setting keeps us tethered to the person we are in ordinary life, but who may not be who we essentially are.

If we find poetry in the service station and motel, if we are drawn to the airport or train carriage, it is perhaps because, in spite of their architectural compromises and discomforts, in spite of their garish colours and harsh lighting, we implicitly feel that these isolated places offer us a material setting for an alternative to the selfish ease, the habits and confinement of the ordinary, rooted world.” – Alain de Botton

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borrego-badlands

Borrego Badlands

http://chimes.biola.edu/story/2013/mar/22/anza-borrego-desert-state-park/

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“People who dream when they sleep at night know of a special kind of happiness which the world of the day holds not, a placid ecstasy, and ease of heart, that are like honey on the tongue. They also know that the real glory of dreams lies in their atmosphere of unlimited freedom. It is not the freedom of the dictator, who enforces his own will on the world, but the freedom of the artist, who has no will, who is free of will. The pleasure of the true dreamer does not lie in the substance of the dream, but in this: that there things happen without any interference from his side, and altogether outside his control. Great landscapes create themselves, long splendid views, rich and delicate colours, roads, houses, which he has never seen or heard of…” – Karen Blixen

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anza-borrego-2

Anza-Borrego Desert State Park

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“There’s power in the touch of another person’s hand. We acknowledge it in little ways, all the time. There’s a reason human beings shake hands, hold hands, slap hands, bump hands.

“It comes from our very earliest memories, when we all come into the world blinded by light and color, deafened by riotous sound, flailing in a suddenly cavernous space without any way of orienting ourselves, shuddering with cold, emptied with hunger, and justifiably frightened and confused. And what changes that first horror, that original state of terror?

“The touch of another person’s hands.

“Hands that wrap us in warmth, that hold us close. Hands that guide us to shelter, to comfort, to food. Hands that hold and touch and reassure us through our very first crisis, and guide us into our very first shelter from pain. The first thing we ever learn is that the touch of someone else’s hand can ease pain and make things better.

“That’s power. That’s power so fundamental that most people never even realize it exists.” – Jim Butcher

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