heaven.

November 11, 2018 § Leave a comment

“I heard what you said. I’m not the silly romantic you think. I don’t want the heavens or the shooting stars. I don’t want gemstones or gold. I have those things already. I want…a steady hand. A kind soul. I want to fall asleep, and wake, knowing my heart is safe. I want to love, and be loved.” ― Shana Abe

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Canyon of the Ancients

Canyon of the Ancients

https://www.colorado.com/national-monuments/canyons-ancients-national-monument-anasazi-heritage-center-blm

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“All endings are also beginnings. We just don’t know it at the time.” ― Mitch Albom

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Canyons of the Ancients National Monument

Canyons of the Ancients National Monument

https://www.grandcanyontrust.org/canyons-ancients-national-monument

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“If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went.”
Will Rogers

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thrill.

November 5, 2018 § Leave a comment

“Not one day in anyone’s life is an uneventful day, no day without profound meaning, no matter how dull and boring it might seem, no matter whether you are a seamstress or a queen, a shoeshine boy, or a movie star, a renowned philosopher or a Down’s-syndrome child. Because in every day of your life, there are opportunities to perform little kindnesses for others, both by conscious acts of will and unconscious example. Each smallest act of kindness—even just words of hope when they are needed, the remembrance of a birthday, a compliment that engenders a smile—reverberates across great distances and spans of time, affecting lives unknown to the one whose generous spirit was the source of this good echo, because kindness is passed on and grows each time it’s passed, until a simple courtesy becomes an act of selfless courage years later and far away. Likewise, each small meanness, each thoughtless expression of hatred, each envious and bitter act, regardless of how petty, can inspire others, and is therefore the seed that ultimately produces evil fruit, poisoning people whom you have never met and never will. All human lives are so profoundly and intricately entwined—those dead, those living, those generations yet to come—that the fate of all is the fate of each, and the hope of humanity rests in every heart and in every pair of hands. Therefore, after every failure, we are obliged to strive again for success, and when faced with the end of one thing, we must build something new and better in the ashes, just as from pain and grief, we must weave hope, for each of us is a thread critical to the strength—to the very survival of the human tapestry. Every hour in every life contains such often-unrecognized potential to affect the world that the great days and thrilling possibilities are combined always in this momentous day.” ― Dean Koontz

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Mount Humphreys

http://written-in-stone-seen-through-my-lens.blogspot.com/2012/09/hiking-mount-humphreys-of-san-francisco.html

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“No job is beneath you.

You ought to be thrilled you got a job in the mailroom And when you get there, here’s what you do: Be really great at sorting mail. ” ― Randy Pausch, The Last Lecture

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wilderness.

November 3, 2018 § Leave a comment

“Putting land aside……and creating wilderness remains a key part of the environmental fight in the West. When Powell made his first maps he knew that the region demanded that some of the land simply had to be left alone. If we are looking at the big picture – a puzzle even – then we need as much land as possible that shows us what the land could do without us. It is a key to adaptation, one clear way we can ready ourselves for the vast uncertainties of a changing climate. /these wild places serve as a counterbalance , a reminder, a baseline, a template for recovery.” – David Gessner

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US395WalkerRiver-700x466

U.S. 395 Walker River

https://www.onlyinyourstate.com/northern-california/backroads-norcal/

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“DeVoto shared with Stegner an ability to see the big picture. But he shared plenty with Abbey, too: a tendency toward overstatement, a willingness to bloody noses, a love of tweaking the overly proper and accepted. Stegner once called DeVoto the “Lone Ranger,” and one can easily imagine DeVoto standing alone in the 1940s and ’50s, keeping a mob of vigilantes (politicians, developers, ranchers, oil men) at bay as they clamored on about taking back “their” land. Stegner joined DeVoto in the fight, but it wasn’t until Ed Abbey came along that anyone took to the fight with anywhere near the same cantankerous spirit.” – David Gessner

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DevilsPostpile near 395

Devil’s Postpile near Highway 395

https://www.viamagazine.com/destinations/highway-395-your-route-sierras-secret-wonders

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“Here is what Secretary of the Interior Bruce Babbitt said about Stegner’s biography of John Wesley Powell: When I first read Beyond the Hundredth Meridian, shortly after it was published in 1954, it was as though someone had thrown a rock through the window. Stegner showed us the limitations of aridity and the need for human institutions to respond in a cooperative way. He provided me in that moment with a way of thinking about the American West, the importance of finding true partnership between human beings and the land.” ― David Gessner

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395

route 395

U.S. 395, the California Highway Least Traveled—and Its Most Epic

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“What I want to preserve are not just beautiful places but the possibility that an individual can, in this overheated, overcrowded world, find a place to be quiet and alone. To have their own freedom. Is this really too much to ask? Shouldn’t there be a few places left to get away from motors? From the incessant roar of machines?”
David Gessner

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1909_hwy58califvalley

Highway 58

https://www.desertusa.com/desert-california/discover-highway-58.html

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“One thing her trip taught, and that is apparent to scientists studying the pronghorn, is the vital importance of “connectivity.” It is a lesson being learned, and preached, by innovative environmental thinkers all over the West, and it applies to many of the region’s threatened species. It comes down to a simple point: wild animals need to roam. It’s true that putting land aside for our national parks may be, to paraphrase Stegner paraphrasing Lord Bryce, the best idea our country ever had, and it’s also true that at this point we have put aside more than 100 million acres of land, a tremendous accomplishment that we should be proud of. But what we are now learning is that parks are not enough. By themselves they are islands—particularly isolated and small islands—the sort of islands where many conservation biologists say species go to die. That would change if the parks were connected, and connecting the parks, and other wild lands, is the mission of an old friend of Ed Abbey’s, Dave Foreman. Foreman, one of the founders of Earth First!, eventually soured on the politics of the organization he helped create. In recent years he has focused his energy on his Wildlands Project, whose mission is the creation of a great wilderness corridor from Canada to Mexico, a corridor that takes into account the wider ranges of our larger predators. Parks alone can strand animals, and leave species vulnerable, unless connected by what Foreman calls “linkages.” He believes that if we can connect the remaining wild scraps of land, we can return the West to being the home of a true wilderness. He calls the process “rewilding.” Why go to all this effort? Because dozens of so-called protected species, stranded on their eco-islands, are dying out. And because when they are gone they will not return. A few more shopping malls, another highway or gas patch, and there is no more path for the pronghorn. But there is an even more profound reason for trying to return wildness to the West. “We finally learned that wilderness is the arena of evolution,” writes Foreman. Wilderness is where change happens.” ― David Gessner, All The Wild That Remains: Edward Abbey, Wallace Stegner, and the American West

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hope.

October 27, 2018 § Leave a comment

“I believe that imagination is stronger than knowledge. That myth is more potent than history. That dreams are more powerful than facts. That hope always triumphs over experience. That laughter is the only cure for grief. And I believe that love is stronger than death.” ― Robert Fulghum

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moki-dugway-1-13

Moki Dugway

http://rvtravels.net/moki-dugway/

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“Thomas Edison’s last words were “It’s very beautiful over there“. I don’t know where there is, but I believe it’s somewhere, and I hope it’s beautiful.” – John Green

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cedar mesa citadel

Cedar Mesa

 

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“There are two basic motivating forces: fear and love. When we are afraid, we pull back from life. When we are in love, we open to all that life has to offer with passion, excitement, and acceptance. We need to learn to love ourselves first, in all our glory and our imperfections. If we cannot love ourselves, we cannot fully open to our ability to love others or our potential to create. Evolution and all hopes for a better world rest in the fearlessness and open-hearted vision of people who embrace life.” ― John Lennon

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respite.

October 25, 2018 § Leave a comment

“Each person deserves a day away in which no problems are confronted, no solutions searched for.” ― Maya Angelou

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Journey to Nowhere

uncompahgre national forest

https://www.wildmoments.net/photo/autumn-snow/

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“And that’s what is so insidious about talk. Anyone can talk about himself or herself. Even a child knows how to gossip and chatter. Most people are decent at hype and sales. So what is scarce and rare? Silence. The ability to deliberately keep yourself out of the conversation and subsist without its validation. Silence is the respite of the confident and the strong.” – Ryan Holiday

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Uncompahgre Wilderness

Uncompahgre Wilderness

https://www.thearmchairexplorer.com/colorado/uncompahgre-national-forest

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“I liked books – the respite and privacy of them – books about plants and the formation of ice and the business of world wars. Whenever I sank into them I felt free.” – Tim Winton

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mooch.

October 23, 2018 § Leave a comment

“Chiltington was a snake. Worse. A garden slug. Maybe a leech. Something oily and slimy that left a greasy trail and liked to mooch off other people’s ideas.” ― Chris Grabenstein

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Comb Ridge Utah

Comb Ridge, Utah

https://www.deseretnews.com/article/865675635/Picturing-history-Comb-Ridge-San-Juan-County-Utah.htmlna

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“Money is made—before it can be looted or mooched—made by the effort of every honest man, each to the extent of his ability. An honest man is one who knows that he can’t consume more than he has produced.” ― Ayn Rand

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drama.

October 18, 2018 § Leave a comment

“You can’t save others from themselves because those who make a perpetual muddle of their lives don’t appreciate your interfering with the drama they’ve created. They want your poor-sweet-baby sympathy, but they don’t want to change.” – Sue Grafton

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camp_north_lockettmeadowwilson

Coconino National Forest, Flagstaff

https://www.arizonahighways.com/explore/camping/lockett-meadow-campground

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“Unfortunately, some family members are so psychotic that no matter how hard you try to forge a healthy relationship, nothing will help. Now that you’re an adult, take refuge in the fact that some things are beyond your control. You owe it to yourself to steer clear of people who are harmful to your health.” – Andrea Laventhal
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636118974203006261-Fall-Leaves-12
Flagstaff
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“Whoever you are, bear in mind that appearance is not reality. Some people act like extroverts, but the effort costs them energy, authenticity, and even physical health. Others seem aloof or self-contained, but their inner landscapes are rich and full of drama. So the next time you see a person with a composed face and a soft voice, remember that inside her mind she might be solving an equation, composing a sonnet, designing a hat. She might, that is, be deploying the powers of quiet.” – Susan Cain
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